The World of Food

Julia Maish

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July is National Ice Cream Month, so designated by President Ronald Reagan back in 1984. At the same time, he also declared that the third Sunday in July would thereafter be known as National Ice Cream Day.

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Julia Maish

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In anticipation of the national premiere of WTTW’s new special and website, Weekend in Havana with Geoffrey Baer, we thought we would provide a quick overview of Cuba’s mouthwatering cuisine, which goes perfectly with a generous side of salsa music, a refreshing cocktail, and (of course) a good cigar.

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Julia Maish

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“Any month whose name contains the letters A, E, or U is the proper time for chocolate.”
— Sandra Boynton

 

 “All you need is love. But a little chocolate now and then doesn’t hurt.”
— Peanuts creator Charles Schulz

 

 “What you see before you, my friend, is the result of a lifetime of chocolate.”
— Katharine Hepburn

 

Today, July 7, is International Chocolate Day, an occasion (all right…an excuse!) for lots of chocolate-fueled celebrations around the world! Dark, milk, bittersweet, combined with other entities such as nuts, toffee, caramel, fruits, nougats, peanut butter, mint; in baked goods, beverages, spreads, ice cream; fillings, coatings, infusions…so many options, too little time!

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Julia Maish

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You have surely heard the phrase “as American as apple pie.” Well, that’s a misnomer, as it turns out that this quintessentially American dessert really originated in Great Britain. Hamburgers and hot dogs? Germany – or to be more specific, Hamburg and Frankfurt, respectively. Mac 'n' Cheese? Italy (or France). French fries? Not France at all, but Belgium.

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Julia Maish

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Beginning with the first sighting of the crescent moon this past Saturday evening, Muslims all over the world celebrated the end of the holy month of Ramadan and commence the month of Shawwal in this Islamic year of 1438 by embarking on the three-day Eid al-Fitr, or “Festival of Breaking of the Fast.” After a month of forgoing all food and drink each day between the early morning meal (Sahoor) and the evening repast (Iftar), the elaborate feast that is central to this important religious observance is a welcome and happy event that signifies “the mercy of God.” (In addition to sharing a delicious meal of halal foods, Muslims are encouraged to “forgive and forget” any differences they may have had with others during the previous year.)

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